Hakkasan Restaurant » Cuisine http://hakkasan.com Hakkasan Restaurant serves Michelin Star awarded Cantonese Cuisine Mon, 11 Dec 2017 15:35:02 +0000 en-US hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=4.1 The culinary influence of Chef Tong’s mother http://hakkasan.com/blog/the-culinary-influence-of-chef-tongs-mother/ http://hakkasan.com/blog/the-culinary-influence-of-chef-tongs-mother/#comments Tue, 01 Mar 2016 15:13:19 +0000 http://hakkasan.com/?p=6854 Chinese cuisine is sometimes described as the “Mother of Asian Cuisine”: it’s one of the world’s most ancient gastronomies, and its influence has spread across mountains and jungle, rivers and cities to impress upon the rest of the world with its complex flavours and diverse ingredients. Its cultural authenticity is recognised even today, with many […]

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Chinese cuisine is sometimes described as the “Mother of Asian Cuisine”: it’s one of the world’s most ancient gastronomies, and its influence has spread across mountains and jungle, rivers and cities to impress upon the rest of the world with its complex flavours and diverse ingredients.

Its cultural authenticity is recognised even today, with many early cooking techniques passed down from generation to generation – often mother to child – with little to no modern modifications.

Food is at the heart of Chinese culture, and its importance is celebrated every day in most Chinese homes. For many people, this positive relationship with food was ingrained in them from an early age.

For Chef Tong, Executive Head Chef of Hakkasan, it is his mother and his grandmother who shaped his early fond memories of cooking, and who eventually influenced his decision to become a chef.

“When I was seven, our family was very poor. We’d go to the mountains to collect firewood every day, and we’d use this for cooking at home. My grandmother would cook the most delicious food; she had such a talent, and she passed that talent on to my mother.

When I looked back at that difficult time of my life, I knew then that I had decided to become a chef so that I could repay the favour and cook for my mother and grandmother.”

While many chefs cook food reminiscent of their childhoods, not many chefs can create dishes based on recipes reminiscent of their mother’s childhood, or their grandmother’s childhood. This illustrious history is a gift to many Chinese chefs; many of the modern recipes we know and love are based on recipes that have been tested and perfected over centuries.

“Many years have now passed, and although my mother and grandmother are no longer with me, I still feel gratitude to them for the success I have achieved. Moreover, they’ve influenced the rest of my family: of my four brothers and sisters, three of them are working as successful chefs.

I never forget my original dream – to cook for my mother and grandmother – even though I’ve experienced many challenges during my years as a chef. It encourages me and helps me to succeed.”

With the approach of Mother’s Day in the United Kingdom, Hakkasan is offering a wide range of signature experiences available as gifts, including Dim Sum Sundays, Hakkasan Hanway Place’s celebration of the ritual of dim sum, an ancient tradition rooted in family reunions and get togethers.

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The symbolism inherent in Chinese New Year cuisine http://hakkasan.com/blog/the-symbolism-inherent-in-chinese-new-year-cuisine/ http://hakkasan.com/blog/the-symbolism-inherent-in-chinese-new-year-cuisine/#comments Tue, 16 Feb 2016 18:02:14 +0000 http://hakkasan.com/?p=5793 The many celebrations during Chinese New Year focus on family reunion, with people travelling across the country to visit the provinces they grew up in and the families they grew up with. Many of these festivities centre on food, from the symbolism of each ingredient used in the celebratory dishes to the culinary rituals associated […]

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The many celebrations during Chinese New Year focus on family reunion, with people travelling across the country to visit the provinces they grew up in and the families they grew up with.

Many of these festivities centre on food, from the symbolism of each ingredient used in the celebratory dishes to the culinary rituals associated with the festival, all deeply rooted in Chinese culture.

Much of the symbolism inherent in Chinese cuisine stems from the homophones associated with each food. While all languages have homophones, they are especially prevalent in Chinese, and they play an important role in the culture of the country.

This is wholly evident in the food eaten around Chinese New Year, when certain dishes are enjoyed not only for their taste but for the symbolism associated with them: each dish represents a particular wish or hope for the coming year.

Jiaozi

With a history of more than 1,800 years, jiaozi, or Chinese dumplings, are traditionally made and eaten on Chinese New Year’s Eve, especially in the northern provinces of China.

The dumplings, often shaped to look like boat-shaped silver ingots, an ancient Chinese currency, are symbolic of prosperity and wealth due to their auspicious shape.

In some provinces it is customary to stay up until midnight on New Year’s Eve to enjoy jiaozi. It is usually served with little other than garlic and soy sauce, and often a coin will be stuffed into one of the dumplings for one of the family members to find: this person will be considered to have the luckiest year ahead.

Tangyuan

Similarly to jiaozi, tangyuan are dumplings that are enjoyed during the Chinese New Year festival. However, that is where the similarities end.

Tangyuan are made from glutinous rice flour usually filled with sesame or red bean paste and served in the sweet broth that they are cooked in. They’re traditionally eaten in the southern provinces of China where rice flour is more common, and they are eaten at the end rather than at the beginning of the Spring Festival celebrations, usually during the Lantern Festival.

They symbolise family reunion, as their name is a homophone for reunion, and their round shape symbolises togetherness.

Yu

Fish is often eaten at Chinese New Year, and it is an ingredient that is celebrated because of its auspicious homophones.

In Chinese, the word for fish sounds like ‘surplus’, and this is an important element for many people to have throughout the year. It is also significant to choose a certain fish based on these homophones; for example, the first character of the word for ‘crucian carp’ sounds like the Chinese word for ‘good luck’, and so therefore eating this fish is considered to bring fortune in the coming year.

It is also crucial that the fish is eaten in a certain way. It should be the last dish left at the meal and there should be some left over, as this represents surplus being available every year. This tradition is practiced north of the Yangtze River, but in other areas the head and tail shouldn’t be eaten until the very beginning of the year, expressing the hope that the year will start and finish with surplus.

Nian gao 

Nian gao, or ‘year cake’, is a sticky rice cake which represents prosperity; the words ‘nian gao’ sounds like ‘getting higher year on year’, and this symbolises raising oneself taller in each coming year.

The Chinese word nian, meaning ‘sticky’, sounds like the word for ‘year’, while the word ‘gao’ meaning ‘cake’ is identical in sound to 高, which means ‘tall’.

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Seasonality in Chinese cuisine http://hakkasan.com/blog/seasonality-in-chinese-cuisine/ http://hakkasan.com/blog/seasonality-in-chinese-cuisine/#comments Mon, 08 Jun 2015 15:44:17 +0000 http://hakkasan.com/?p=4190 Chinese cuisine is as diverse as its many regions and inhabitants. Traditional northern Chinese food is glutinous and meat-heavy, with an emphasis on dumplings, either steamed or deep fried in hot oil, and sticky-sweet braised braised pork belly or shoulder. Szechuan cuisine is famous for the tingling, numbing heat of Szechuan pepper, while Guangdong is […]

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Chinese cuisine is as diverse as its many regions and inhabitants. Traditional northern Chinese food is glutinous and meat-heavy, with an emphasis on dumplings, either steamed or deep fried in hot oil, and sticky-sweet braised braised pork belly or shoulder. Szechuan cuisine is famous for the tingling, numbing heat of Szechuan pepper, while Guangdong is known for its dim sum and Beijing for its Peking duck. A multitude of skills and techniques are utilised, from searing hot wok frying at exact temperatures to slower, gentler methods of roasting and poaching.

Chinese cuisine also reflects the changing seasons. According to Traditional Chinese Medicine, there are specific ingredients and flavours that should be eaten each season to counteract the changing weather. This relates in some way to the ancient Chinese philosophy of yin yang, suggesting that the complementary forces in the world need to be balanced to maintain harmony. This theory extends to seasonal ingredients and methods of cooking: natural harmony is achieved by eating or drinking foods that are similar in nature to the environment.

Derived from the yin and yang philosophy, many foods are described as hot or cold (or somewhere in between). This is used to describe the ‘energies’ of the food and drink rather than their specific temperatures, and it is a concept used widely in China.

Spring

Spring is the season of new birth and growth. It is important during this time to eat cool and sweet foods as opposed to the warming foods of winter, such as spinach, celery, onions, lettuce, mustard leaf, wheat, dates, peanuts, coriander, bamboo shoots and mushrooms.

Summer 

In summer, plants grow fast and people act more energetically. The Chinese suggest eating ‘yin’ or cooling foods during these months. However, if the temperatures climb, it is recommended that cold foods are consumed, such as bitter gourd, watermelon, peach, strawberries, tomatoes, mung beans, cucumber, pumpkin, ginger, lotus root, lotus seeds, wax gourds and Job’s tears.

Autumn

In the autumn, trees start to shed their leaves and fruits mature. During these months, the Chinese cook with neutral and sour foods, such as sesame, honey, pineapple, pear, loquat fruit, sugar cane, banana and white fungus.

Winter

Living things start to slow down to save energy during winter. Some animals hibernate, while humans conserve energy and concentrate on building strength. Warming or ‘yang’ foods that are high in starch and calories should be eaten during this time, such as red meat and dark coloured foods to restore chi. Mutton, goose, duck, Chinese yam, glutinous rice, dates, eggs, longan fletch, black fungus, leeks and nuts are all warm foods that are eaten to stave off the cold in winter.

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The unique Chinese Islamic cuisine http://hakkasan.com/blog/the-unique-chinese-islamic-cuisine/ http://hakkasan.com/blog/the-unique-chinese-islamic-cuisine/#comments Mon, 25 May 2015 11:03:38 +0000 http://hakkasan.com/?p=8262 Food, and the preparation of it, is something that enables people to come together and speak a universal language. Eating is an essential part of human existence, and it is a comforting, simple and enjoyable thing to do. Food acts as a way of saying thanks, of celebrating, and of paying respects. Moreover, it represents […]

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Food, and the preparation of it, is something that enables people to come together and speak a universal language.

Eating is an essential part of human existence, and it is a comforting, simple and enjoyable thing to do. Food acts as a way of saying thanks, of celebrating, and of paying respects. Moreover, it represents different cultures and helps strengthen cultural ties.

China owes much of its exciting and diverse cuisine to its varied inhabitants. While Cantonese is arguably the most widely recognised regional cuisine, there are many other styles that make up the Chinese repertoire.

Chinese Islamic cuisine, also known as “huizu cai”, is the unique cuisine of the Hui people. The religion of Islam was introduced in China around the Tang Dynasty (651AD) by Arab traders, and as the religion thrived throughout the country, so did the cuisine.

The cuisine is heavily influenced by the food of Beijing, with nearly all cooking methods identical, and it differs only due to religious restrictions, such as the omission of pork.

Traditionally, there is a distinction between northern and southern Chinese Islamic cuisine: the former is meat-heavy, relying on beef and mutton, while the latter is lighter, relying on duck, geese and seafood. This is due to geography and subsequent availability of ingredients: while ducks, geese and seafood are relatively rare in the arid climate of northern China, beef is easily purchased and transported from nearby countries.

Huizu cai blends the flavours of the Middle East with authentic Chinese dishes: hand pulled noodles called lamian (“la” means to pull or stretch, while “mian” means noodles) are served in meaty stocks of beef or mutton with a tomato-based sauce, a slick of chilli oil and a flourish of coriander leaves; chuan, or meat kebabs, are flavoured with cumin and dried chilli flakes and roasted over charcoal.

Food is often at the heart of celebrations. For Muslims around the globe, Ramadan is a time of reflection and fasting. During Ramadan, two main meals are served: the suhoor, served before dawn and often consisting of heavy and hearty foods to last throughout the day; and the iftar, which is served after sunset.

The act of fasting is intended to be humbling and increase moral discipline as well as serve as a reminder of those less fortunate. At the end of the month, Muslims celebrate the Festival of the Breaking of the Fast, called Eid al-Fitr.

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Yin and yang in Chinese cooking http://hakkasan.com/blog/yin-yang-chinese-cooking/ http://hakkasan.com/blog/yin-yang-chinese-cooking/#comments Wed, 26 Nov 2014 17:24:15 +0000 http://hakkasan.com/?p=3227 The ancient Chinese philosophy of yin and yang plays a significant role in Chinese cuisine.

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The ancient Chinese philosophy of yin 阴 and yang 阳 – often shortened to yin yang – is a concept used to describe how apparently opposite forces are in actuality complementary to each other. The theory suggests that these complementary forces are present in all things, and that it is necessary for these forces to be balanced. This differs from Western society, where people predominantly believe in good versus evil, and that these forces are resolutely and unequivocally opposed to one another with no way of connecting the two.

Yin and yang are represented by many tangible dualities, such as light and dark, fire and water, and male and female. It is believed that everything has both yin and yang aspects – for example, light cannot exist without shadow. However, either of the two aspects may manifest more strongly in a particular object. Yin is represented as the feminine, passive, dark, cold, while yang is represented as masculine, active, light, warm. The sun is yang, the moon is yin – the yin and yang Chinese characters even contain the characters for moon 月 and sun 日.

This philosophy plays a significant role in Chinese culture, specifically traditional Chinese medicine and Chinese cuisine. In fact, Chinese medicine and food are intrinsically linked: Chinese practitioners suggest that a person’s health can be improved with a change in diet in order to restore a healthy balance between the yin and the yang in the body. The macrobiotics diet developed by American-Japanese writer George Othsawa is largely based on this philosophy.

Most foods can be separated into either being predominantly yin, predominantly yang or a balance between the two. These foods aren’t determined by their physical temperature; rather, they are determined by multiple characteristics. Generally speaking, foods that have a higher water content are considered cool, or yin, whereas foods that have a higher energy content, particularly from fat, are considered warm, or yang.

Soy products such as tofu and beansprouts, crab (such as the Shanghai hairy crab), most fruits, and vegetables such as watercress, cucumbers, carrots and cabbage are considered yin foods. Duck and beef, warm spices such as cinnamon, nutmeg and ginger, alcohol, nuts such as almonds and peanuts, eggs and glutinous rice are considered yang foods. Yin foods are generally bitter, salty and sour, while yang foods are generally sweet and pungent.

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An exploration into dim sum http://hakkasan.com/blog/exploration-dim-sum/ http://hakkasan.com/blog/exploration-dim-sum/#comments Mon, 10 Nov 2014 19:28:50 +0000 http://hakkasan.com/?p=3150 Dim sum is a style of Cantonese food that has grown increasingly popular around the world in recent years.

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The tradition of yum cha, at one point designed to be a relaxing respite, has evolved over the years to the loud and jovial dining experience relatable to dim sum restaurants all over the world today.

In southern China, and specifically Hong Kong, many restaurants start serving dim sum as early as five in the morning and close mid-afternoon. However, the tradition has grown increasingly popular in the Western world in recent years, and now modern dim sum restaurants serve food as an evening meal. Dim sum is typically prepared as individual mouthfuls, traditionally served in bamboo steamer baskets or on small plates in groups of three or four.

Dim sum is often linked with yum cha, the older Chinese tradition of drinking tea. Historically, the tradition of yum cha began in the latter part of the 19th century in response to the increasing amount of people passing through the ancient Silk Road route through southern China. Many travelers needed a place to rest and recuperate, so teahouses in Guangzhou (or Canton) serving tea and small portions of food opened up along the roadside.

The term ‘dim sum’ can be translated from Chinese to mean ‘touch the heart’. The small dishes were originally designed to satisfy hunger rather than sate the appetite, hence the name: dim sum should merely touch the heart rather than overwhelm the stomach.

A standard dim sum meal consists of various types of dishes, including steamed buns, dumplings and rice noodle rolls. Dim sum is often cooked in a number of different ways, including frying, steaming, broiling and roasting.

Each dim sum is intricately prepared, using a range of different and complicated cooking techniques. Chefs spend years training to perfect the art of dim sum preparation, and it is in this that many dim sum chefs are judged. Har gau, for example, is the dish that is said to be the most complex, and is therefore the dish that many hold as the ultimate decider of the skills of a chef.

Har gau, also occasionally referred to as shrimp bonnets in reference to their pleated shape, are transparent and smooth in texture. They should have at least seven and preferably 10 pleats; the skin must be thin and translucent, but be sturdy enough not to break open when picked up with chopsticks; and they must not stick to the paper, container, or any other har gau in the basket.

Hakkasan Hanway Place has launched a new menu at the weekly Dim Sum Sundays events. The menu includes a selection of steamed, fried and baked dim sum, all inspired by seasonal ingredients.

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The eight culinary traditions of China http://hakkasan.com/blog/eight-culinary-traditions-china/ http://hakkasan.com/blog/eight-culinary-traditions-china/#comments Mon, 20 Oct 2014 15:37:52 +0000 http://hakkasan.com/?p=3019 There are many different variations of Chinese cuisine, but the most widely recognised and influential of these regional cuisines are referred to as the eight culinary traditions of China.

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Chinese cuisine is rich and diverse, varying in style and taste from region to region. Its history dates back thousands of years, evolving according to changes in both the environment (such as climate) and local preferences over time. Chinese cuisine also varies depending on class and ethnic background, and it is often influenced by the cuisines of other cultures. All these factors contribute to an unparalleled range of cooking techniques, ingredients, dishes and eating styles that make up what is understood to be Chinese food today.

Of the various regional styles of Chinese cuisine, it is the Cantonese cuisine from Guangdong that is the most widely recognized globally. Many Western Chinese restaurants have adopted a style of Cantonese cooking due to the majority of Chinese emigrants from Guangdong who moved to the United States and Europe in the 1800s. Indeed, Hakkasan’s menu is predominantly Cantonese or Hakka, a cuisine developed by the Hakka people who lived within the Guangdong province. However, there are a number of distinctive styles from different regions that contribute to the whole of Chinese cuisine, and of these there are eight specific culinary traditions that are recognized throughout Chinese society and around the globe.

These eight culinary cuisines are Anhui, Cantonese, Fujian, Hunan, Jiangsu, Shandong, Szechuan and Zhejiang.

 

Anhui (Hui)

Anhui cuisine is derived from the native cooking styles of the people located in the Huangshan Mountains region in China. Although it is similar to Jiangsu cuisine, there is less emphasis on seafood and more on a wide variety of locally grown herbs and vegetables from both the land and the sea.

 

Cantonese (Yu)

Due to Guangdong’s proximity to the South China Sea, the people of the region have access to a plentiful supply of imported food and fresh seafood. Cantonese cuisine incorporates almost all edible meats, including chicken feet, duck’s tongue, snakes and snails. However, due to availability, lamb and goat are rarely eaten. Many cooking techniques are used, including wok hei (stir frying) and steaming. Spices are used moderately, and fresh herbs are seldom added to the food. Dishes include dim sum, small morsels of food typically served at breakfast or lunch alongside tea; barbequed char siu, sticky and burnt red in color; and clear broths flavored with meat stock.

 

Fujian (Min)

Fujian cuisine is influenced by its coastal position and mountainous terrain, and ingredients such as woodland mushrooms, bamboo shoots, fish, shellfish and turtles are used regularly. The cuisine in this area is known to have particular emphasis on umami taste; the dishes are notoriously light and flavorful.

 

Hunan (Xiang)

Like Szechuan cuisine, Hunan food is renowned for being hot and spicy, with garlic, chili peppers and shallots used liberally. However, unlike Szechuan cuisine, it is known for being purely hot as opposed to the searing, numbing heat of Szechuan cooking.

 

Jiangsu (Su)

Jiangsu cuisine consists of a several different styles of Chinese cooking, namely Huaiyang, Yangzhou, Nanjing, Suzhou and Zhenjiang. The food in Jiangsu cuisine is known as being soft, but not to the point of falling apart: the meat tastes tender but wouldn’t separate from the bone when picked up.

 

Shandong (Lu)

Derived from the native cooking styles of Shandong, a northern coastal province of China, Shandong cuisine consists of two predominant styles: Jiaodong, characterized by light seafood dishes; and Jinan, a style that features the use of soup in its dishes. Although it is less available in the West, Shandong cuisine is often considered one of the most influential styles of cooking in the Chinese culinary history.

 

Szechuan (Chuan)

Szechuan cuisine is renowned for its use of bold flavors; chili, garlic and Szechuan pepper are used liberally throughout the dishes. Szechuan pepper has a unique taste: it is intensely fragrant, citrusy and causes a numbing sensation in the mouth. Szechuan cuisine often contains food that has been preserved through pickling, salting and drying.

 

Zhejiang (Zhe)

In general, Zhejiang food is fresh and light rather than greasy. It consists of at least four styles of cooking: Hangzhou, characterized by the use of rich foods and bamboo shoots; Shaoxing, specializing in poultry and fish; Ningbo, specializing in seafood; and Shanghai, with xiao long bao.

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Wok hei, or the ‘breath of the wok’ http://hakkasan.com/blog/wok-hei-breath-wok/ http://hakkasan.com/blog/wok-hei-breath-wok/#comments Tue, 07 Oct 2014 17:38:32 +0000 http://hakkasan.com/?p=2957 Chinese cooking techniques such as wok hei are as important in Chinese cuisine as the ingredients that form the dish.

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Wok hei translated into English means ‘wok thermal radiation’ or, metaphorically, the ‘breath of the wok’. It refers to the flavour and tastes imparted by a hot wok on food during stir frying, and is particularly important for those Chinese dishes requiring searing heat such as Hakkasan’s black pepper rib eye beef with merlot or Wok-fried XO lamb chop. These dishes should have a complex smoky flavour that is only achieved by cooking fresh ingredients over extreme heat, meaning that the flavour develops while simultaneously retaining the textural crunch.

While extremely high heat is necessary, creating wok hei is more difficult than simply raising the flame temperature underneath the wok to extraordinarily high levels. In fact, creating wok hei is so tricky to get right that often it is used as a measure of a Chinese chef’s skill, and these chefs often spend years trying to perfect the art.

In order to achieve wok hei, there are a number of different things to consider:

  • The wok should be heated gradually so that it reaches a very high temperature just before the oil, raw vegetables and meat are added. The cooking oil shouldn’t be added until the wok is screaming hot, and then it should be added cold just before the raw ingredients are added. This way, the oil won’t chemically decompose due to the high temperatures.
  • The amount of oil added to the wok is important: too much and the food will be fried, too little and wok hei won’t be achieved. The reason a flame ignites is due to the water on the ingredients causing fine oil droplets that mix with the oxygen in the air coming into contact with the flames below the wok when the food is tossed. The flame is necessary for wok hei to create that singed, smoky taste.
  • The water in the ingredients, coming mainly from any raw vegetables, is important to achieve wok hei but difficult to manually control. Too much water in the vegetables and they will become soggy in the wok, but too little the food will dry out or burn.
  • It’s important not to include too much food in the wok when trying to achieve wok hei. Stir-frying a small amount allows for accurate temperature control and quick stirring.

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Hakkasan’s wine program http://hakkasan.com/blog/hakkasans-wine-program/ http://hakkasan.com/blog/hakkasans-wine-program/#comments Mon, 09 Jun 2014 23:14:43 +0000 http://hakkasan.com/?p=1470 Since its inception, Hakkasan’s wine program has set a standard for the classification and selection of wines used. It features nearly 400 wines, found by buyer, Christine Parkinson. Hakkasan organizes its wine into themes that suggest why each was chosen. Arranged by body and flavor, from lighter wines to more full-bodied selections, it features collections from the finest vineyards around the world.

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“The food chooses the wine.”

A prestigious wine program at a fine dining Chinese restaurant used to be almost unheard of. When Wine Buyer Christine Parkinson began her journey with Hakkasan Group she had concerns, not knowing if guests would acquire a taste for wine, and more specifically premium wines, whilst enjoying the restaurant’s cuisine.

In 2001 Parkinson joined Hakkasan Group, determined to find the best products. On this journey she found that guests responded well to pairing the Chinese fare with premium wines. Now, more than 10 years later, Hakkasan features nearly 400 wines as part of its extensive wine program.

Parkinson soon discovered  that there was no one body of knowledge in existence that spoke with authority about  the rules of wine and how to pair it with Chinese cuisine. Inspired by this opportunity for innovation Parkinson set her own rules and standards, which later turned into the ethos of Hakkasan’s wine program. Her rules were simple – each product had to be excellent quality and work well with the cuisine. From here, Hakkasan’s wine program was born.

Since its inception, Hakkasan’s wine program has set a standard for the classification and selection of wines used. With wines categorised under “Curious Vines: distinctive wines”, “Genius without a Château: the new classics” and “Spiritual Wines”, guests are given a look into why these wines were selected. For example, “spiritual wines” signifies the biodynamic production of the wine,  reflecting how the vines are treated during the harvesting process.

Hakkasan employs what is known as the “Tuesday Tasting” where all sommeliers gather to taste current and potential wines accompanied by items from the dinner menu, to ensure a harmonious tasting experience. Tuesday Tastings have become ritual for Hakkasan, taking place at each restaurant. The tasting process is extensive, as each sommelier’s perspective is taken into account and used to formulate the ultimate decision about each wine. During this process, the theory of “The food chooses the wine” takes precedence.

Although the selection process for Hakkasan’s wine program is an extensive one, the goal is quite simple – find wines that work well for guests. Christine Parkinson, who herself has been named “one of the most creative wine buyers in the UK,” by Jancis Robinson MW on her Purple Pages, is confident that guests will have a remarkable experience no matter which wine they choose, for the simple reason that each and every wine offered goes exceptionally well with Hakkasan’s Chinese cuisine.

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The philosophy behind Hakkasan’s modern Cantonese cuisine http://hakkasan.com/blog/philosophy-behind-hakkasans-modern-cantonese-cuisine/ http://hakkasan.com/blog/philosophy-behind-hakkasans-modern-cantonese-cuisine/#comments Tue, 01 Apr 2014 19:34:11 +0000 http://hakkasan.com/?p=1452 In 2001, Hakkasan changed the face of Chinese cuisine. The menu offering has a strong Chinese identity, yet, conveys an ethos of cooking that is informed by an innovative approach, underpinned by authenticity rather than traditionalism. This modern validity is the raison d’etre of Hakkasan’s alluring menu, including signature dishes such as the Crispy duck salad, Hakka steamed dim sum platter and the Jasmine tea smoked short rib.

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In 2001, Hakkasan created a fine dining experience that changed the face of Chinese cuisine. With just a single location at the time, Hakkasan set a standard in London and soon expanded to become a global brand.

With 12 restaurant locations worldwide, Hakkasan has stayed true to the ideals and practices that accompanied it on its path to success. The philosophy of “Modern Authenticity” is at the forefront of the group’s DNA, representing a balance between tradition and progression. Hakkasan has embedded this philosophy into its design, wine and beverage program, service, brand standards and most importantly, its cuisine.

The beauty and brilliance behind the Hakkasan cuisine is that each visit brings with it new flavors and a different type of experience. Most dishes are designed for sharing, so guests can try a variety of offerings. Some of the most popular dishes to start with are the Crispy duck salad, Hakka steamed dim sum platter or the Jasmine tea smoked short rib. After this, guests may move on to mains like Grilled Chilean seabass with Chinese honey, or the Black Pepper Ribeye beef,  accompanied by sides such as  the Hakka noodle or Egg and Scallion fried rice.  Rounding off your meal with a palate-cleansing dessert  is a must at Hakkasan, and the signature macarons or the Exotic fruit platter is a delightful conclusion to the journey.

All of the dishes are prepared with a consideration for tradition and deliver a modern, authentic impression. The flavor is bold, yet light. The aroma is nostalgic, yet doesn’t overpower.

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