Hakkasan Restaurant » Events http://hakkasan.com Hakkasan Restaurant serves Michelin Star awarded Cantonese Cuisine Mon, 11 Dec 2017 15:35:02 +0000 en-US hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=4.1 The Evolution of Ling Ling http://hakkasan.com/blog/the-evolution-of-ling-ling/ http://hakkasan.com/blog/the-evolution-of-ling-ling/#comments Wed, 08 Jun 2016 10:35:44 +0000 http://old.hakkasan.com/?p=8324 Ling Ling, a new experience by Hakkasan, launched on the idyllic whitewashed Greek island of Mykonos last year. This year Ling Ling will open in Marrakech, in the opulent surroundings of the Mandarin Oriental Hotel. To celebrate this opening, Hakkasan is featuring a cocktail flight illustrating the Evolution of Ling Ling. Eder Neto, Head of […]

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Ling Ling, a new experience by Hakkasan, launched on the idyllic whitewashed Greek island of Mykonos last year. This year Ling Ling will open in Marrakech, in the opulent surroundings of the Mandarin Oriental Hotel.

To celebrate this opening, Hakkasan is featuring a cocktail flight illustrating the Evolution of Ling Ling.

Eder Neto, Head of Bar UK and Europe, explains the development of the exclusive flight:

“Fifteen years ago, Hakkasan Hanway Place opened, and with it the original Ling Ling, the late night lounge synonymous with Hakkasan, adorned with leather furniture, black and gold panels and candlelight.

The Bitter Fortune, served in a short, no stem glass suited for its club basement surroundings, was one of the first cocktails created once an identity had been given to Hakkasan’s drink offering.

This, to me, epitomises Ling Ling’s origins. It’s a cocktail of contrasts: bitter yet sweet and zesty with pink grapefruit, Aperol and peach bitters.

It is also the perfect base to make other flavours sing.

We took the basement to the beach with the second cocktail, the Golden Mare, with sultry, heady Mediterranean herbal flavours of rosemary and basil as well as the classic aniseed flavours of Pernod, representative of the Greek national drink of ouzo.

The third cocktail in the flight, the Chilli Coupette, is symbolic of Marrakech, with the complex spices of desert souks and mint reminscient of the mint tea enjoyed so much in the area.

The Bitter Fortune, the cocktail created in London, is rooted in the origin of Ling Ling: its aromatic ingredients complement both the fragrant herbs of the Mediterranean and the intricate spices of Morocco, but it also stands confidently and rebelliously on its own.”

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Chinese New Year, the Year of the Sheep http://hakkasan.com/blog/chinese-new-year-year-of-the-sheep/ http://hakkasan.com/blog/chinese-new-year-year-of-the-sheep/#comments Tue, 10 Feb 2015 12:54:15 +0000 http://old.hakkasan.com/?p=3643 Chinese New Year, known as the Lunar New Year or the Spring Festival, is one of the most auspicious dates of the Chinese calendar. It is celebrated at the turn of the Chinese lunar calendar, and therefore the date differs each year. This year Chinese New Year falls on Thursday, February 19th, although traditionally festivities run […]

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Chinese New Year, known as the Lunar New Year or the Spring Festival, is one of the most auspicious dates of the Chinese calendar. It is celebrated at the turn of the Chinese lunar calendar, and therefore the date differs each year. This year Chinese New Year falls on Thursday, February 19th, although traditionally festivities run from Chinese New Year’s Eve to the Lantern Festival, a festival that concludes New Year, on the 15th day of the first month.

Celebrations

While Chinese New Year is celebrated across China and in many neighbouring territories such as Hong Kong, Taiwan, Singapore, Korea, Vietnam and Malaysia amongst others, regional customs and traditions concerning celebrations vary widely.

For instance, a reunion dinner known as Nian Ye Fan 年夜饭 will be held for family members on Chinese New Year’s Eve, but the food served at this meal will differ depending on where in China it is being celebrated, although most dinners will include a whole chicken, symbolising prosperity, togetherness and joy, and a whole fish, symbolising abundance of money. In fact, the Chinese phrase “may there be surplus every year” sounds the same as “may there be fish every year”.

In some countries of Southeast Asia, Chinese New Year is considered to be one of the most important holidays of the year, with the biggest celebrations taking place in Malaysia and Singapore. In Singapore there is an annual street parade, well-known for its colorful floats and performances. Similarly, the Lam Tsuen Wishing Trees in Hong Kong draw many a visitor – local and tourist – to throw oranges up into their branches for good luck.

The Year of the Sheep

The Chinese lunar calendar is associated with the Shēngxiào, or Chinese zodiac. This year is the Year of the Sheep (also known as the Year of the Goat or Ram).

The sheep is recognised as one of the animals of the zodiac that people like the most; gentle and calm, the sheep is unable to walk backwards or sideways and so continues plodding onwards, indicating that 2015 will be a year that people will progress, slowly yet steadily.

The sheep is also the eighth zodiac animal, making it one of the most auspicious signs; eight is one of the luckiest numbers in China, symbolising peace and wealth.

Mythology

According to ancient Chinese folklore, a mythical beast called the Nian would visit a small village in China at the beginning of New Year and terrorise the people, eating livestock, crops and even villagers, especially children. However, it was soon discovered that the Nian hated both the colour red and loud noises. From then on every Chinese New Year’s Eve, families hang red banners from their houses, decorate the streets with red lanterns and let off loud firecrackers in order to scare the Nian away.

Symbolism

Red is the predominant color used in Chinese New Year celebrations. It symbolises virtue, truth and sincerity, and is seen as joyful.

Red envelopes, known as ‘lai see’ in Cantonese and ‘hong bao’ in Mandarin, are often presented at social and family gatherings during Chinese New Year to children or unmarried and unemployed adults. The red color of the envelope symbolises good luck and is supposed to ward off evil spirits.

Typically, the envelopes contain money. The amount of money given usually ends in an even number, as off-numbered money gifts are traditionally associated with funerals. There is also a widespread tradition that money should not be given in fours, or the number four should not appear in the amount (such as 40 and 404) as the pronunciation of the word ‘four’ sounds like that of the word for ‘death’ and thus signifies bad luck.

Hakkasan will be offering all guests who dine from the signature Chinese New Year menu a red envelope containing a gift. This will be accompanied by a red wishing ribbon, and guests will be encouraged to share their wishes for 2015 before hanging the ribbon on the latticed woodwork in the restaurants. These wishes will be shared on the Hakkasan Wishes Instagram page and Chinese New Year website.

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The Chinese New Year Lam Tsuen Wishing Trees tradition http://hakkasan.com/blog/chinese-new-year-lam-tsuen-wishing-trees-tradition/ http://hakkasan.com/blog/chinese-new-year-lam-tsuen-wishing-trees-tradition/#comments Mon, 12 Jan 2015 12:12:36 +0000 http://old.hakkasan.com/?p=3420 Chinese New Year is one of the most significant and important festivals in the Chinese calendar. Celebrations traditionally run from the last day of the last month (known as Chinese New Year’s Eve) to the Lantern Festival on the 15th day of the first month. Within China, traditions and customs vary widely depending on region. […]

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Chinese New Year is one of the most significant and important festivals in the Chinese calendar. Celebrations traditionally run from the last day of the last month (known as Chinese New Year’s Eve) to the Lantern Festival on the 15th day of the first month.

Within China, traditions and customs vary widely depending on region. Typically, most people begin festivities on the Chinese New Year’s Eve with a family-oriented dinner, often bringing together family members who work away from home for a reunion. It is also customary for families to thoroughly clean the house, sweeping away ill-fortune and bad luck to make way for incoming good luck.

The Chinese New Year tradition of the wishing tree arguably began hundreds of years ago in Lam Tsuen, Hong Kong. During Chinese New Year, villagers would travel for miles to visit the sacred Lam Tsuen Wishing Trees, two ancient banyan trees situated near the Tin Hau Temple in Fong Ma Po village, one of the 23 traditional Chinese villages that make up Lam Tsuen.

It is believed that the wishing custom originated from fishermen who would throw paper josses made from bamboo into every Tai Pak Kung (earth god) tree on their way into the New Territories of Hong Kong to bring them good luck and protection.

Historically, people would burn joss sticks before writing their wishes down, tying it to a small orange or kumquat, and then throwing the wish up to hang in the branches of the trees. It was believed that if the wish successfully hung onto one of the branches, the person’s wish would come true. The higher the branch the wish landed on, the more likely it would be for the person’s hopes to be fulfilled.

Although people are now discouraged from throwing their wishes up into the trees, tourists and locals still make the journey to the small village every year to tie their wishes onto wooden support beams, imitation trees or racks that surround the original wishing trees.

Hakkasan will be honouring the wishing tree tradition by offering all guests around the world who dine during this festive time the opportunity to write their wishes on red ribbon and hang them on the latticed woodwork. These wishes will be shared on our Hakkasan Instagram page and website.

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Golden Week 黄金周 http://hakkasan.com/blog/hakkasan-golden-week/ http://hakkasan.com/blog/hakkasan-golden-week/#comments Wed, 17 Sep 2014 17:52:47 +0000 http://old.hakkasan.com/?p=2602 Hakkasan locations around the world will celebrate Golden Week between September 29th and October 12th with limited edition authentic set menus.

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Golden Week in China happens biannually, once in January or February to celebrate the Spring Festival and the Chinese Lunar New Year, and once at the beginning of October to celebrate China’s National Day. Everyone that is employed in the country is given three days of paid holiday, and the weekends before and after are rearranged so that workers in Chinese companies have seven consecutive days off.

These national holidays were first started by the Chinese government to encourage travel across the country, thus naturally and organically expanding the domestic tourism market, and to allow for migrant population to travel home and visit their families. This has inevitably led to heightened travel activity over the seven days; regularly over 100 million people take to the road, rail or air at the same time.

National Day in China occurs on October 1st and marks the start of the second Golden Week. It was on this day in 1949 that the People’s Republic of China was officially founded, with a ceremony held in Beijing’s Tiananmen Square. However, it wasn’t until 1999 that the holiday was extended to a week.

While the Spring Festival Golden Week at the beginning of the year is typically more family-orientated, the National Day Golden Week has a larger focus and emphasis on travel and holidaying, either within China or further abroad.

Travel is actively encouraged. The Chinese government announced in 2012 that national highways would remain toll free for the duration of the week, allowing people to travel on the roads for cheaper.

Increasingly, more and more Chinese now have the funds to accompany their growing keenness to see the world, and so take the opportunities available to them at Golden Week to journey to the west to visit the US or the UK.

To view Hakkasan’s Golden Week video on VisitBritain, click here.

 

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