Hakkasan Restaurant » Uncategorized http://hakkasan.com Hakkasan Restaurant serves Michelin Star awarded Cantonese Cuisine Mon, 11 Dec 2017 15:35:02 +0000 en-US hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=4.1 Fire with Fire http://hakkasan.com/blog/fire-with-fire/ http://hakkasan.com/blog/fire-with-fire/#comments Fri, 27 Jan 2017 11:11:23 +0000 http://old.hakkasan.com/?p=9552 Vera Chok, writer, actress and performance maker, explores the personality traits of the rooster ahead of Chinese New Year.

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Vera Chok, writer, actress and performance maker, explores the personality traits of the rooster ahead of Chinese New Year.

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The importance of tradition at Chinese New Year http://hakkasan.com/blog/the-importance-of-tradition-at-chinese-new-year/ http://hakkasan.com/blog/the-importance-of-tradition-at-chinese-new-year/#comments Thu, 28 Jan 2016 14:22:01 +0000 http://old.hakkasan.com/?p=5725 There are many traditions and family rituals associated with Chinese New Year. These customs, loyally passed down from one generation to the next, are an integral part of celebrations. They’re rooted in folk stories and ancient mythology, from the fireworks and firecrackers that are exploded on New Year’s Eve that are symbolic of driving away […]

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There are many traditions and family rituals associated with Chinese New Year.

These customs, loyally passed down from one generation to the next, are an integral part of celebrations. They’re rooted in folk stories and ancient mythology, from the fireworks and firecrackers that are exploded on New Year’s Eve that are symbolic of driving away evil to the red envelopes known as ‘hongbao’ containing money originally given to children to protect them from sickness and ill health.

Cleaning

It is traditional for families to clean their houses and the areas surrounding before the start of the new year. The word ‘dust’ in Chinese is a homophone for ‘old’, thus cleaning the house is symbolic of driving away the bad luck of the previous year to allow for a new start.

Spring Festival couplets

In Chinese poetry, a couplet is a pair of lines of poetry which adheres to certain rules: both lines must have the same number of Chinese characters, the tone of one line must be inverse to the other, and the meaning of the two lines need to be related, with each pair of corresponding characters having related meanings too. The custom of attaching couplets to doorways, often written in calligraphy on red paper, before Chinese New Year can be traced as far back as the Later Shu State (934-965), a thousand years ago, where people would hang a piece of peach wood in order to protect against evil. In the Song Dynasty, the couplets would be written on the wood to express people’s good wishes.

Food

It is customary across China to eat dumplings during this celebratory time. In the northern provinces of China, the jiaozi, a dumpling made with flour and often stuffed with coins, peanuts or sweets symbolising different blessings, is enjoyed at midnight on New Year’s Eve, while tangyuan, sweet glutinous rice dumplings, are eaten in southern Chinese provinces such as Guangdong. Jiaozi signify wealth and prosperity; their shape resembles the ancient Chinese ingot, a currency used up until the 20th century, while the roundness of the tangyuan dumplings represent family unity and reunion.

The colour red

Red is an important colour in New Year celebrations as it symbolises a bright and happy future. It is a significant colour related to Chinese folk stories, such as the Nian in which red banners were displayed in houses to scare away the monster that would visit every Chinese New Year.

Coins

During the Qin Dynasty, the elderly would thread eight coins with a red string and give them to the children in their family. These coins were often referred to as “money warding off evil spirits”, or ‘ya sui qian’, and was believed to protect the person from illness. These coins were replaced in later years by red envelopes. The red envelopes nearly always contain money, varying from a couple of yen to a couple of thousand. The amount of money in the red envelopes is always even as odd numbers are associated with money given at funerals.  The number eight is considered lucky as it sounds like the word for ‘wealth’, as is the number six as it can also mean ‘smooth’, and symbolises having a smooth year.

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Hakkasan gifts http://hakkasan.com/blog/hakkasan-gifts/ http://hakkasan.com/blog/hakkasan-gifts/#comments Mon, 14 Dec 2015 15:53:00 +0000 http://old.hakkasan.com/?p=5242 The act of gift giving is globally recognised. Japan is considered the most prevalent gift-giving country – in fact, so much so that it is a common stereotype that the Japanese have closets full of used gifts because they’re given for every conceivable occasion – while in China ancient traditions based largely around respect, relationships […]

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The act of gift giving is globally recognised. Japan is considered the most prevalent gift-giving country – in fact, so much so that it is a common stereotype that the Japanese have closets full of used gifts because they’re given for every conceivable occasion – while in China ancient traditions based largely around respect, relationships and rituals influence the role that gifts play, and they are usually given to strengthen the bond between two people.

Gifts can take on many appearances, from red envelopes containing money (given during the Spring Festival, also known as Chinese New Year) to culinary presents (such as peaches which symbolise longevity).

Hakkasan is offering a wide range of signature experiences available as gifts. These experiences include Dim Sum Sundays, Hakkasan Hanway Place’s celebration of the ancient Chinese ritual of dim sum, the Taste of Hakkasan menu for two curated by Executive Head Chef Tong Chee Hwee, the Whisky and Chocolate Flight with three whiskies and accompanying handmade chocolates, and the Hakkasan signature menu.

Alternatively, a gift of Louis Roederer Champagne, especially chosen to complement the intricate spices of Chinese cuisine, can be purchased, alongside monetary vouchers from £25 upwards.

For more information, click here.

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Inside HKK: Hakkasan’s culinary workshop http://hakkasan.com/blog/inside-hkk-hakkasans-culinary-workshop/ http://hakkasan.com/blog/inside-hkk-hakkasans-culinary-workshop/#comments Wed, 14 Oct 2015 09:38:07 +0000 http://old.hakkasan.com/?p=4873 From the Chinese kitchen, whose chefs create unique dishes using both ancient and contemporary cooking techniques, to the expertly crafted desserts that complement the intricate spices and seasonings of Chinese cuisine and the skilfully created wine list, HKK is the showcase for Hakkasan’s industry experts. Executive Head Chef Tong Chee Hwee, Executive Chef for Hakkasan, […]

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From the Chinese kitchen, whose chefs create unique dishes using both ancient and contemporary cooking techniques, to the expertly crafted desserts that complement the intricate spices and seasonings of Chinese cuisine and the skilfully created wine list, HKK is the showcase for Hakkasan’s industry experts.

Executive Head Chef Tong Chee Hwee, Executive Chef for Hakkasan, heads up the state-of-the-art kitchen, where he and his team work together to create a continuously evolving menu that illustrates his passion for creating complex flavoured Chinese dishes with a modern flair. The tasting menus tell the story of China through reviving and modernising centuries-old recipes, from salt baking inspired by techniques used hundreds of years ago by the indigenous Hakka people of China to using the sous-vide method for delicate cooking of ingredients before they are paired with bold and distinctive Chinese flavours.

The pastry kitchen at HKK is overseen by Executive Pastry Chef Graham Hornigold. He and his team led by talented Head Chef Melanie Nelson-Ström are responsible for creating desserts that explore the relationship between classical European recipes and how they can complement the spices inherent in Chinese cuisine while also standing alone, enjoyable at any time of the day or night.

Christine Parkinson, Head Wine Buyer for the group, has won numerous awards for her creative and innovative wine lists across restaurants such as Hakkasan, Yauatcha and Sake no Hana. The wine list at HKK journeys her discovery of wine: it’s an extensive list that includes wine from both local and far-flung places, and each section is creatively described. The Harmony tasting flight is offered to accompany each dish, and ranges from sakes and cocktails to unique fine wines.

Innovation exists at the heart of HKK. The people who use the restaurant as their culinary workshop are constantly striving: for uniqueness, for experience, for perfection. The journey is just as important, if not more so, than the final destination. HKK is a restaurant where ideas are born, developed and evolved.

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How Golden Week is celebrated around the world http://hakkasan.com/blog/how-golden-week-is-celebrated-around-the-world/ http://hakkasan.com/blog/how-golden-week-is-celebrated-around-the-world/#comments Fri, 11 Sep 2015 12:05:35 +0000 http://old.hakkasan.com/?p=4708 Golden Week is the name given to two separate holidays or festivals in China. The first occurs at the beginning of the year and is more commonly referred to as Spring Festival or Chinese New Year, while the other coincides with the National Day of the People’s Republic of China on 1st October. Golden Week […]

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Golden Week is the name given to two separate holidays or festivals in China. The first occurs at the beginning of the year and is more commonly referred to as Spring Festival or Chinese New Year, while the other coincides with the National Day of the People’s Republic of China on 1st October.

Golden Week and National Day celebrations in China

National Day honours Mao Zedong’s 1949 declaration of independence. The day is celebrated throughout China, Hong Kong and Macau, and it marks the start of Golden Week and the seven day national holiday.

National Day celebrations begin with the raising of the Chinese National flag in the capital city of Beijing, before the country’s military take to the streets for a series of large parades and festivals. Many people take the often long trip to Beijing’s Tiananmen Square to watch the festivities and take in the atmosphere, and cities are often decorated with red lanterns symbolising happiness and fortune. The day concludes with fireworks displays across each of the major cities of China, including Hong Kong and Macau.

Golden Week celebrations in the West

While Golden Week is relatively new – it was implemented only 15 years ago – the numbers of people who choose to travel during this time, either to return to their rural homes in China or to travel abroad, has increased dramatically.

During the first Golden Week, 28 million Chinese travelled either domestically or internationally. However, this year it is expected that over 610 million will travel, with many choosing to visit Europe and the United States.

In 2014, approximately 200,000 Chinese tourists travelled to London, the shopping capital of the UK, during Golden Week. And that number is set to rise, with figures estimating that 18% more Chinese tourists will decide to travel abroad this year.

Golden Week celebrations in Hakkasan

Hakkasan restaurants around the world are celebrating Golden Week by introducing a limited edition signature menu that is traditionally and authentically Chinese, alongside a cocktail, golden macarons and dark chocolate desserts. The menus differ from restaurant to restaurant, ranging from the exclusive Supreme dim sum platter to a full Golden Week a la carte menu.

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